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Rwanda

This category contains 10 posts

Africa’s Massive Power Shortage Alleviated by China

When one flies over sub-Saharan Africa at night, there are only pinpricks of light, a stark comparison to what one sees flying over Asia, Europe, or Latin America. Sub-Saharan Africa remains the “dark continent,” seriously short of electrical energy generating capacity. Industrial development is hampered almost everywhere, even in South Africa, because of insufficiencies in … Continue reading

It’s Time for Canada to Back an International Anti-Corruption Court

Corrupt dealings undercut development, distort national priorities, accentuate inequality, and enrich conniving elites. Where governance is weak, corruption enables whole populations to be deprived of educational opportunities or access to health benefits. Corruption gives rise to civil conflict and its profits fuel long internal wars such as those in Afghanistan and the Democratic Republic of … Continue reading

China Joins African Peacekeeping

China surprised President Obama and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon on Sept. 28 by promising to create an 8,000 strong standby peacekeeping brigade for use on the African Continent. President Xi Jinping also committed $100 million over the next five years to the African Union (AU) for assistance in establishing a crisis response African standby … Continue reading

Africa Plagued by Third Term-itis

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan’s graceful acceptance of his loss this year to incoming President Muhammadu Buhari was a major advance for African democracy, for setting peaceful transition precedents, and for helping to mature political leadership on the continent. But that easy handover to an opponent was exceptional. Equally often, African rulers cling tenaciously to their … Continue reading

Making Africa Less Corrupt

In many African countries, petty corruption provides daily payoffs to policemen, nurses, border guards, and bureaucrats. Then there is venal corruption: the big-ticket items. In South Africa, President Jacob Zuma and his cronies received cash for favoring the state purchase of frigates and fighter aircraft from France and Sweden. Nigeria is the home of almost … Continue reading

Ameliorating Africa’s Energy Shortfall

China is helping significantly to reduce sub-Saharan Africa’s crippling energy shortages. By constructing myriad hydroelectric production facilities across Africa, by building high-tension transmission lines from north to south, and by helping at least one country to convert sunshine into power, China is playing a major role in relieving a major developmental weakness. All of sub-Saharan … Continue reading

Africa Again Teeters on the Edge of Democracy

African leaders are afflicted with an acute case of third termitis. Although constitutions in 20 sub-Saharan African nations explicitly prohibit presidents serving more than two usually five-year terms, incumbents like their trappings of office, declare themselves absolutely indispensable (on little evidence), and frequently forcibly shred legal provisions to the contrary. Vaunted assertions of “indispensability” occur … Continue reading

Good Governance: Even Africa’s Best are Nothing to Brag About

    Africa’s development chances and social possibilities remain heavily hindered by its overall mediocre governance. Despite the talk of Africa rising and growth rates that now exceed other parts of the globe, too many of the continent’s peoples are subject to the kinds of governments that favour ruling elites rather than ordinary villagers and … Continue reading

Washington’s Good Intentions for Africa are Not Enough

Ebola epitomizes Washington’s Africa problem. With more than 40 African leaders meeting President Barack Obama, Vice-President Joseph Biden and Secretary of State John Kerry in the U.S. capital this week to celebrate the continent’s burgeoning economic prospects, governance weaknesses remain sadly real and a big drag on development. The presidents of Sierra Leone, Liberia and … Continue reading

PREVENTING RENEWED ATROCITIES TWENTY YEARS AFTER THE RWANDAN GENOCIDE

  The Rome Statute of 1998 was a response to the genocide in Rwanda and the slaughter in Serbia, and an attempt to create an effective judicial mechanism that would be more enduring and more global in its jurisdiction than the existing special ad hoc tribunals for Yugoslavia and Rwanda and any new ones that … Continue reading